Hemp in the News – South Australian Parliament votes yes to hemp legalisation

The South Australian Parliament put Hemp in the News this week with their approval of legalising industrial hemp. This means farmers will be able to plant hemp in their fields in just a matter of weeks.

Hemp in the News

This is not only good news for farmers. It is also a very helpful boost to the individuals and businesses who are making and selling hemp products, because they will no longer need to source their hemp supply from overseas, according to Tammy Franks, Greens Upper House member and sponsor of the bill.

At this time, the industrial hemp industry in South Australia is producing clothes, cosmetics and building supplies.

Industrial hemp is a type of cannabis plant, but it has less than one percent of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active chemical that gives the high. So smoke it all you want, but you won’t get high.

Click here to read the full story.

Hemp Politics – Alaska Senate approves bill to legalise hemp

In Hemp Politics this week, the Alaska Senate collectively agreed to pass a bill for the legalisation of hemp cultivation and marketing.

Sen. Shelley Hughes backed Senate Bill 6, saying that her bill will alter hemp’s status to be its own agricultural product distinct from marijuana, ultimately removing it from the controlled substances list.

Hemp Politics

Hughes states that the economic potential and opportunities that hemp has to offer are endless. There are literally thousands of uses for hemp, from fibre products like paper and textiles, to building materials and insulation.

Click here to read the full story.

Hemp in the News – NC hemp commission won’t be suing the DEA just yet

A potential lawsuit against the DEA has repeatedly put Hemp in the News lately, but the N.C. Industrial Hemp Commission has decided not to join in the lawsuit against the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration just yet.

Hemp in the News

The commission, formed in 2015 to help advance a hemp industry in the state, backs a local company that intends to sue the DEA for its recent law change that deems any products made with CBD (cannabidiol oil) illegal, and prohibits state to state distribution. The president of the Founder’s Hemp, Bob Crumley, invited the commission to team up with them on the lawsuit.

But rather than taking legal action right away, last week the commission requested that the Attorney General’s Office try to resolve the issue directly with the U.S. Department of Justice and try to determine why the DEA has a different understanding of the hemp transportation law than Congress.

The commission chairman, Tom Melton, said he is not completely opposed to taking legal action against the DEA, but wants to try resolving it outside of court first.

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Hemp Politics – Hemp research paying off in the U.S.

The 2014 federal farm bill has done a lot to transform Hemp Politics in the U.S.

Hemp research has been conducted in several U.S. states over the past few years, and the results have provided farmers with valuable information on how to grow industrial hemp. It has proven hemp to be a highly feasible crop with great economic potential for the U.S.

Hemp Politics

The farm bill authorised universities and state agriculture departments to set up research programs to study the benefits of cultivating industrial hemp. Many products can be made from the fibre of the plant, such as paper and clothing, and the oil from hemp can be used in food and health products. There are currently fifteen states with research programs, and more states are signing up.

Hemp Industries Association Executive Director, Colleen Keahey, said the hemp research programs that have been in operation the last several years have had a significant impact on the industry. She believes there is great importance in government agencies working together to define industrial hemp according to the farm bill.

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Hemp in the News – The largest hemp event in the U.S.A. happens this weekend

The NoCo Hemp Expo is the centre of Hemp in the News this week. The event, scheduled to take place in Loveland, Colorado from March 31 to April 1, will showcase innovative hemp research and production.

Hemp in the News

Speakers, exhibitors and participants will gather from around the world, to share information about the latest industrial hemp research and new production techniques.

Day 1 of the event, Friday, March 31,  will focus on e-commerce, the exchange of products, services and information between businesses, and Saturday, April 1 will focus on consumers.

NoCo Hemp Expo founder Morris Beegle, said this is the only place in the world where people can go to get information about the hemp industry and to make connections. There will be law-makers, farmers, processors, innovative producers and research developers, gathered in the same place for the event.

It’s the place to be for all hemp experts and enthusiasts!

Click here to read more.

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Hemp Politics – Could hemp outrival oranges as a Florida crop?

With hemp’s growing popularity amongst Americans, and its nickname of being a miracle crop, its no wonder Hemp Politics are changing.

Some Florida residents believe that hemp could even outrival oranges in the agricultural department. But there is still some resistance among some lawmakers.

Hemp Politics

Industrial hemp has a significant place in the history of the United States. Presidents Washington and Jefferson both cultivated hemp on their plantations, and during WWII the government encouraged farmers to increase their production of hemp, in support of their Army and Navy.

Despite hemps notorious history, for many years it was banned by the government, because of its close relation to marijuana. But hemp differs greatly from its cousin, marijuana, especially when it comes to THC content. THC is the psychoactive chemical, but hemp contains mere traces of it. Certainly not enough to get you high.

In the last few years, the U.S. government has begun loosening its laws around industrial hemp. In 2014 the Federal Farm Bill was introduced, giving states the opportunity to create programs to grow hemp for study and research purposes.

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Hemp in the News – Hemp trial in NZ harvests success for the future

A coastal community in Ruatoria, New Zealand, puts Hemp in the News with the harvest of their first hemp crop.

Hemp in the News

The crop was planted as a test to see if it can be a viable industry in the area. Its success has revealed the potential for a new industry and job creation.

Hikurangi Enterprises, a generous company based in Ruatoria, welcomed members of the community to join in the harvest. There were about 5000 plants grown at a site that was kept secret.

The invitation drew about 50 people from the community, who were interested in seeing what kind of plant could potentially transform their community economically.

Panapa Ehau, Hikurangi Enterprises’ general manager, said their motivation for the trial hemp plot was to involve the community, open up a discussion about the crop, and create employment opportunities. With the success of their first crop, it is likely the first of many.

Hikurangi Enterprises received a licence to grow from the Health Ministry, and planted the first seeds in mid-December.

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Hemp in the News – New Mexico Governor vetoes hemp bill for the second time

Governor Susana Martinez’s opposition for hemp legalisation put Hemp in the News again this week.

House Bill 144 was rejected by Martinez, closing the door on New Mexico’s opportunities for the employment and economic benefits that a hemp industry could bring. Three Representatives sponsored the bill, Bealquin “Bill” Gomez, Antonio “Moe” Maestas, and Rick Little, sharing the opinion that HB 144 would have introduced a lawful and standardised hemp industry to New Mexico, paving the way for farmers to join a booming $600 million industry.

Hemp in the News

Rep. Maestas said Martinez’s rejection of the bill wiped out innumerous jobs and eliminated new economic potential for the state. With the proven success in at least thirty other states, the logical choice would have been to vote in favour of the new industry that promises jobs and a big boost to the state’s economy.

The different parts of the plant, (stalk, grain, and floral), can be used to create a number of products, such as textiles, paper, building materials, food, beverage and nutritional products, cosmetics and biofuel, to list just a few. The industrial hemp market offers a wealth of opportunity with little effort required.

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Hemp in the News – South Australia gives the go ahead for hemp cultivation

A decision by the Australian government to back a Greens party Hemp Bill has put Hemp in the News. The bill will make industrial hemp legal in South Australia.

The new hemp laws will make it legal to cultivate industrial hemp for the production of such products as cosmetics, clothing, textiles and building materials.

Hemp in the News

Industrial Hemp Bill 2016 was first presented to Parliament by Greens MLC Tammy Franks. Some amendments will be made to the Bill, by Manufacturing and Innovation Minister Kyam Maher.

The new bill will eliminate the legal obstacles that have blocked hemp farming up until now, thus opening up new possibilities and opportunities for growers and manufacturers to investigate industrial hemp’s potential.

Maher commented that farmers will now have the option of growing hemp in South Australia, and can obtain a license to grow it. Manufacturers will be able to explore a new range of hemp-based products, such as textiles, construction materials and cosmetics.

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Hemp Politics – Let Kansas grow hemp!

In U.S. Hemp Politics there is a growing need to let go of the past and to allow industrial hemp to flourish. A law that is outdated and futile stands in the way of a new crop with the potential to completely turn things around for farmers in Southwest Kansas.These farmers are dealing with terrain that is very dry and water levels that are drying up.

Hemp is a harmless plant that got mixed up in the campaign to criminalize marijuana back in the 30’s. But unlike marijuana hemp is a viable crop replacement for farmers who are struggling to get by with the likes of corn, milo and wheat, due to a combination of low prices and difficult growing circumstances.

If Kansas lawmakers could just forget about the past and be open to the study and research of industrial hemp, Southwest Kansas farmers could have access to a cash crop that could relieve them of their current struggles.

Hemp Politics

Hemp doesn’t need a lot of water to grow and it can thrive in many different climates and terrains. In addition to hemp farming, new markets for industrial hemp could open up and provide economic benefits to the state. The federal Farm Bill of 2014 paved the way for such research and development. Now it’s up to the individual states to get on board.

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