Hemp History – Wisconsin farmers and politicians are all in for hemp

The state of Wisconsin made Hemp History in November 2017, when it became the first state to collectively approve a hemp pilot program. Farmers were on board with hemp from the get go.

Hemp History

For the hemp pilot program, the Wisconsin Hemp Alliance received close to 250 applications for growing hemp, and 100 applications for processing it. The same enthusiastic response happened with the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, which removed hemp from the list of controlled substances. The applications from both growers and processors increased immensely from the year before.

Now Wisconsin is taking the next step forward. Gov. Tony Evers signed into law a bill that expands Wisconsin’s hemp pilot program into a permanent one.

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Hemp History – Hemp’s path to the future

The U.S. made Hemp History with federal legalisation. Now one U.S. company is refining cannabinoids, which will change the future of hemp.

Hemp History

Despite hemp’s significant place in U.S. history, its resemblance to marijuana has always caused problems. The 1937 Marijuana Tax Act created a substantial downfall in the hemp and marijuana industries, due to the high tax rate on these plants.

During WWII, the U.S. government encouraged farmers to grow hemp, for the war effort. After thirty years, the Marijuana Tax Act was abolished, but only one year later, the Controlled Substances Act banned cannabis use completely.

In the nineties, a handful of states started to reintroduce hemp growing for medicinal purposes, going against all federal rules. With the enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill, all this has changed and a new era has begun.

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Hemp History – Indiana hemp harvest makes history

Indiana is making Hemp History with the first hemp harvest the state has seen in decades. Hemp is a member of the cannabis family, but it won’t get you high. It is grown for its industrial uses, for making thousands of products such as rope, clothing, paper, and CBD oil.

Hemp History

Changes in federal and state hemp laws set the stage for the return of this versatile crop. Approximately 100 farmers were selected to grow the first hemp crop, and given state permits to do so. These farmers are growing hemp for research purposes, to test its viability and market potential.

Hemp was banned in the U.S. in 1937, ultimately due to its resemblance to marijuana, but it is making a strong comeback now that it is legal, once again.

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Hemp History – Rhode Island makes history with first crop in decades

Rhode Island is making Hemp History, as hemp is harvested for the first time in 50 years.

Hemp History

Dawson Hodgson, co owner of Sodco Turf Farm in Rhode Island, planted 65 acres of hemp this year, and is harvesting up to 70,000 plants. Hodgson is taking the lead for Rhode Island’s new hemp industry.

The hemp crop at Sodco Turf Farm has been a great success. Good weather conditions made cultivation easy, with the need to water only once. Harvesting and processing has had its challenges, but as Hodgson says, you fix the problems and move on.

Since Congress removed hemp from the list of controlled substances last year, the industry has experienced rapid growth all across the U.S.A.

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Hemp History – Slow comeback for hemp textiles in the U.S.

Despite the significant role of Hemp History in the U.S., experts say it will take some time to reestablish hemp textiles in the industry. Hemp textiles were once widely accepted in the U.S., substantiated by the fact that the U.S. Constitution was written on hemp paper.

The recent legalization of hemp in the U.S. has spurred a reawakening of the industry nationwide. The number of farmers growing hemp has increased exponentially this year. They have high hopes of cashing in on this versatile crop that was illegal to grow for over 80 years.

The majority of farmers are growing hemp for CBD production. This variety of plant is short and bushy, much unlike the tall variety of hemp grown for fibre and textiles.

Hemp fibre is strong and durable, which is why it was used to make rope, sails and canvas many years ago. Now there are ways of using hemp to make clothing, upholstery fabric and silk, and hemp textiles last much longer than cotton.

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Hemp History – Wisconsin working to revive its hemp industry to better the future

The roots of Hemp History take us back to 5000 B.C. in China. In trying to find an alternative to animal-based clothing, the Chinese discovered that hemp could be used to create fabric. They also found that hemp could be used to make shoes, rope and paper.

Hemp History

Hemp is now making a comeback, due to its many uses and sustainability. It fits well into the new age of technology by supplying eco-friendly options for modern living.

Several American presidents have grown hemp in the past, including Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and Andrew Jackson. Hemp was once a thriving industry in the U.S. and Wisconsin is one of several states that want to revive this versatile plant.

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Hemp History – Hemp industry needs standards in order to obtain structure

There is no known terminology in Hemp History to quantify the crop. There are wheat bushels and potato centuries, but what do we call hemp?

Hemp History

The 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp from the controlled substances list. It is now an agricultural commodity in the U.S., but there is yet to be a universal name for hemp quantities.

From seed quantities to fibre lengths, there is no standardization. This is leading to confusion with investors, as there’s no method for determining numbers. Jay Noller, head of Oregon State University’s new Global Hemp Innovation Centre, said everyone is saying, “People are investing in hemp but we don’t know what to divide it by.”

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Hemp History – Degree in Hemp? A college in North Dakota creates a new degree

Dakota college in Bottineau is attempting to make Hemp History by offering a new program in hemp production.

Hemp History

The college is applying to the State Board of Higher Education for permission to teach a two year degree and a certificate program in hemp cultivation. If approved, classes could start as early as January 2020.

Campus Dean Jerry Migler recognizes the potential of this revitalized crop and the new opportunities it can bring the state.

The curriculum will focus on growing low THC industrial hemp, for industrial and commercial purposes. It will be a two year degree program, with the option of a shorter certificate program.

North Dakota was one of a number of states that implemented the hemp pilot program in accordance with the 2014 Farm Bill. The program was for research purposes only. As a result of the federal legalization last year, the state now has more than 50 growers.

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Hemp History – Kentucky’s future is hemp

Kentucky’s Hemp History may be convoluted but the crop is making a strong comeback in the state. This, after decades of tobacco farming.

Hemp History

On his family’s tobacco farm in Kentucky, Brian Furnish inspects the harvest that is hanging to dry inside the barn. The scent of tobacco that was grown here for generations is fading, and the rich smell of hemp is taking over.

Like many tobacco farmers in Kentucky, Furnish recognizes the need for change. Tobacco is the crop of the past, and hemp is Kentucky’s crop of the future.

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Hemp History – Pennsylvania reverts to its farming history

In U.S. Hemp History, industrial hemp was illegal for several decades, due to its close resemblance to marijuana. What lawmakers didn’t take into consideration, is that hemp does not hold the psychotropic values found in its close cousin, marijuana.

Hemp History

State government in Pennsylvania has changed rules and regulations to make commercial growing of industrial hemp much easier for farmers.

Farmers are no longer limited to growing 100 acres of hemp. Also, there is no longer a cap to how many farmers can grow hemp in the state.

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